1900 United Confederate Veterans Reunion was hosted in Louisville

The 1900 United Confederate Veterans Reunion was hosted in Louisville. Here is the program.

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The 1900 UCV Reunion took place May 30th thru June 3rd in Louisville. It was the 10th Annual Reunion. Up to 150,000 people were expected to attend.

Louisville was the 18th largest city in America in 1900 with 204,731 residents.

Screen Shot 2016-09-26 at 4.29.04 PM.pngThe aim of the UCV was “to further literary, social, and benevolent aims among the survivors of the Confederate Army.” There were 40,000 living Confederate Veterans in 1900. The New York Times said that around 3,000 veterans were expected to attend the Reunion.

There were 1,300 UCV camps in 1900. General John B. Gordon was elected Commander-in-Chief in 1890 and re-elected in 1900.

The 1900 UCV Reunion in Louisville raised $223,000 for the Confederate Memorial Building in Richmond.

Most public buildings and structures were draped in red-n-white bunting for the reunion. Portraits of Confederate Generals were suspended from the tallest buildings. The “Court of Honor” was in Jefferson Street, opposite the Courthouse, where there was an erected viewing stand. The viewing stand had a great white arch surmounted by eagles. In the center was a Confederate shield. Hundreds of lights lit the stand up at night.

The Reunion Hall was situated at Sixth and Water Streets, overlooking the Ohio Falls. It was 200×400 feet and 12 feet above the street. The hall contained 8,000 chairs plus allowed for standing room of 10,000 people. Every window contained the name of every battle with at least 500 men killed in battle. Interspersed above thew windows were the names of Confederate leaders.

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May 26, 1900, front page, Kentucky Irish American

The main window above the stage bore this inscription:

“Less than 100,000 fighting men surrendered after enduring four years of suffering. The survivors of these are here today, and Kentucky is proud and happy.”

Here was a partial program:

Source: May 16, 1900 | The Breckinridge News, page 6| Cloverport, KY

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A planned re-enactment of the Battle of Perryville was rained out. The Grand Reception Ball took place June 1st. It allowed for 4,000 dancers and 6,000 spectators, compete with accompanying orchestra.

A veteran of the 3rd Georgia entered the hall waving the flag and whooped up the crowd to a near-frenzy as the band struck up “Dixie,” followed by the Rebel yell “with a fire and vigor that was never surpassed during the days of the war.”

About 50 Cherokee veterans from North Carolina attended; who served under Colonel Stringfield. They attracted much attention at the reunion.

Colonel J.B. Speed donated the money for the Confederate reunion headquarters, on 436 W. Jefferson Street, between Fourth and Fifth, as well as for the Tennessee headquarters. Kentucky Irish American, March 10, 1900.

Mingo Evans attended the reunion, heralded as a Negro hero from Alabama. Mingo, a slave of the Evans family, accompanied Joe Evans to Virginia in 1861 with the 9th Alabama. Joe was killed in the first battle of Manassas, and Mingo took his place. Mingo was injured and discharged from the military and sent home, taking with him the skull of a Yankee soldier. When Union soldiers came for the skull, Mingo hid in the mountains until the end of the Civil War. He had paid his own way to the reunion in Louisville, traveling with the veterans of Camp Horace King.

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May 26, 1900, below, Kentucky Irish American

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May 28, 1900, New York Times. REUNION OF CONFEDERATES. Louisville Prepares to Welcome Veterans of Southern Army. New York Times, May 28, 1900. [see above]

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Mementos and Memorabilia from the 1900 UCV Reunion in Louisville

This invitation belonged to Brig. General W.R. Boggs of N.C.

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1900-UCV Reunion-Louisville-Flat Celluloid Canteen-Winnie Davis

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The 1900 United Confederate Veterans Reunion Louisville, Kentucky

Bibliography

The Adair County News, 06/06/1900, p. 2, col. 3.
The Bee. Earlington, Hopkins County Kentucky. May 24, 1900. CONFEDERATE REUNION. Arrangements are being made on grand scale at Louisville. Front page, column six, top.

Confederate Veteran, Nashville, Tennessee, September, 1900, Vol. 8, No. 9. “Fraternal Resolutions at Louisville”

Confederate Veteran, Vol. 10, No. 9, September, 1902. “The Kentucky Confederate Soldiers’ Home, Pewee Valley, Near Louisville.”

Confederate Veteran, Vol. 12, No. 12, December, 1904. “Reunion with photograph of Kentucky Confederate Soldier’s Home, Without Annex, Pewee Valley, Near Louisville.”

Confederated Southern Memorial Association (CSMA). Museum of the Confederacy. Minutes of the Meeting Held for the Organization of the Confederated Southern Memorial Association Louisville, KY, May 30th, 31st, and June 1st, 1900 (New Orleans, 1900).

Confederated Southern Memorial Association (CSMA). Charter, constitution and by-laws of the Confederated southern memorial association; organized at Louisville, Ky. 1900.

http://ia600105.us.archive.org/8/items/CharterConstitutionAndBy-lawsOfTheConfederatedSouthernMemorial/CSMAchart.pdf

Crichton, Judy. America 1900: The Sweeping Story of a Pivotal Year in the Life of a Nation. New York: Henry Holt & Company, 1998.

Foster, Gaines M. Ghosts of the Confederacy: Defeat, the Lost Cause and the Emergence of the New South, 1865-1913. Oxford University Press, 1988.

Klotter, James C. Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox. Pp: 8. [see below]
Marshall, Anne E. Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State (Civil War America). The University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

Marten, James. Sing Not War: The Lives of Union and Confederate Veterans in Gilded Age America (Civil War America). The University of North Carolina Press, 2011.

Museum of the Confederacy. UCV, Tenth Annual Reunion, Louisville, KY, May 30-31, June 1-3, 1900:

* Information Bulletins(2); Souvenir, “Cum A Runnin’.”; official order of exercises; program * two admission tickets to official reviewing stand [from MC3 H-506 http://www.moc.org/site/DocServer/Veterans_Collection_Inventory_for_website_revised_april_.pdf?docID=2401

New and correct map of the city of Louisville. Louisville, KY : Falls City Lithograph and Job Printing Co., 1900. The Filson Historical Society. List of Headquarters U.C.V., points of interest, leading hotels, accommodations, halls. etc.

New York Times. REUNION OF CONFEDERATES. Louisville Prepares to Welcome Veterans of Southern Army. New York Times, May 28, 1900. [see below]

New York Times. OLD CONFEDERATES MEET.; United Veterans’ Reunion at Louisville Begins. New York Times, May 31, 1900. [see below]

Official souvenir programme : tenth annual reunion of the United Confederate Veterans, Louisville, May 30 to June 3, 1900. Louisville, Ky.?] : Thos. E. Powell and Co., Publishers, 1900. The Filson Historical Society.

Osborne, Thomas D. First Kentucky Brigade, C. S. A. : scrapbook, 1882-1925. Kentucky Historical Society-Library.

This collection consists of a scrapbook of the First Kentucky Brigade, otherwise known as the Orphan Brigade. The scrapbook is made up of materials relating to the brigade’s reunions. This includes photographs, newsclippings, minutes of the reunions, and obituaries of members who had passed on before each reunion. the states, 1861-1865.

The Owingsville Outlook, Thursday, June 7th, 1900. No. 46, VOL. XXI. (Front page, column 2, bottom) [see below]

Register, 1900. Register for the reunion of the United Confederate Veterans, Louisville, Ky., 1900. The Filson Historical Society.

Shaw, A. “The Confederate Reunion at Louisville,” The American Monthly Review of Reviews, 1900, v.22, Jul-Dec, p. 20-21. [see below]

From May 30 to June 6, 1900, the Confederate Reunion was held in Louisville, KY. It was estimated that a hundred thousand visitors attended the reunion, one of whom was Mingo Evans, heralded as a Negro hero from Alabama. Mingo, a slave of the Evans family, accompanied Joe Evans to Virginia in 1861 with the 9th Alabama. Joe was killed in the first battle of Manassas, and Mingo took his place. Mingo was injured and discharged from the military and sent home, taking with him the skull of a Yankee soldier. When Union soldiers came for the skull, Mingo hid in the mountains until the end of the Civil War. He had paid his own way to the reunion in Louisville, traveling with the veterans of Camp Horace King.

State of New York. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg 1913, Report of the New York State Commission. “Address by Major John H. Leathers, Former Sergeant-Major, Second Virginia Infantry, ‘Stonewall’ Brigade, C.S.A.” J.B. Lyon Company, Albany, New York. 1916

A picture of Sgt-Major Leathers is found on page 31.

United Confederate Veterans. Headquarters Executive Committee, John A. Broadus Camp, U.S.C.V. … Extract from the minutes of a meeting … held May 23, 1900. Louisville, Ky, 1900.
University of Georgia Libraries.

United Confederate Veterans. Minutes of the Ninth Annual Meeting and Reunion of the United Confederate Veterans. New Orleans, 1900.

United Confederate Veterans. Minutes of the Tenth Annual Meeting and Reunion of the United Confederate Veterans. New Orleans, 1902.

United Confederate Veterans. United Confederate Veterans Register, 1900. The Filson Historical Society Special Collections.

Fraternal organization of Confederate veterans. Register for the 1900 reunion of Confederate Veterans in Louisville (Ky.). Contains a list of people who attended the reunion, where they were living at the time of the reunion and which Confederate unit in which they served. Card file in repository.

Walden, Geoffrey R. Remembering Kentucky’s Confederates (Images of America: Kentucky). Arcadia Publishing, 2008.

Western North Carolina: A History. Chapter XXVI. The Cherokee. [see below]
Williams, Rusty. My Old Confederate Home: A Respectable Place for Civil War Veterans. University of

Kentucky Press, 2010.

Wilson, Charles Reagan. Baptized in Blood: The Religion of the Lost Cause, 1865-1920. University of Georgia Press, 2009.

Wood, Robert C. Confederate hand-book; a compilation of important data and other interesting and valuable matter relating to the war between the states, 1861-1865.